24 May 2015

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

Rescuing North Africa's Migrants

The current migration is being driven by the genocidal warfare of which they are victims in their home countries.

More Women Find Room for Babies and Advanced Degrees

The share of highly educated women who are childless in their mid-40s has fallen significantly over the last two decades, a Pew Research Center analysis says.

The Methodology: 1.5 Million Missing Black Men

How we analyzed census data to study the gender imbalance among African-Americans who are 25 to 54.

Maryland: Census Bureau Guard Is Critically Wounded

A gunman shot and critically wounded a guard at the Census Bureau headquarters on Thursday before leading the police on a chase that reportedly ended with the suspect and an officer wounded.

The Giant Retirement Community That Explains Where Americans Are Moving

The Villages area in Florida shows that warmth and affordable housing have helped a pre-recession population trend reassert itself.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

The science of choice - How to model the decision-making process?

On October 28-30, a workshop on the individual decision-making process will take place at the MPIDR. Paper proposal can be submitted until July 15.

The role of communication in demographic change

At this year's Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, MPIDR-researcher Sebastian Klüsener has been awarded a prize for a research poster. The research project addresses the question of why various social groups experience demographic change at different pace – temporally and spatially. 

Mortality in the USA

MPIDR researchers Alyson van Raalte and Vladimir M. Shkolnikov have been awarded a Poster Prize at this year Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA). The two researchers compared mortality data of industrialized countries in order to understand mortality differences among these countries.

Happy Birthday!

MPIDR-director Jim Vaupel turns 70 on May 2. The MPIDR staff wish him a happy birthday!

MPIDR at the Population Association of America 2015 Annual Meeting

Many MPIDR researchers will present their work at the Meeting of the Population Association of America, which takes place in San Diego from 30 April to 2 May. The Institute will also have an exihibition booth.

Demography Matters

Population Ageing and Global Externalities - What if QE is not temporary?

This post first appeared on Alpha.Sources, but given the arrival of Ben Bernanke to the world of econ blogging and the interaction between him, Krugman and Summers, I would it would be interesting to highlight it to DM's readers too. This discussion of market failures and externalities is mostly a microeconomic discussion. Students will tend to encounter it, in the context of the classic case of

On cat islands and the wider potential of rewilding

I'm still fond of a old post of mine that I had made back in January 2011, "What the cats of Houtong say about the population of Taiwan". That post, drawing on a September 2010 post I made at my blog, examined how the Taiwanese village of Houtong, located just outside the capital of Taipei, has managed to find new life after its coal mining economy went under thanks to its large feral cat

On the transformation of Canada's temporary foreign worker program

Today in Canada is a notable day in Canada's immigration history, for today is the day that changes in the Temporary Foreign Worker program are going to have a significant but as yet uncertain effect on the lives of people in the Canadian labour market. David P. Ball's article in British Columbian newsmagazine The Tyee, "Foreign Worker Exodus Expected as New Rules Kick in" outlines the situation

Is Finland's Economy Suffering From Secular Stagnation?

"After the Great Depression, secular stagnation turned out to be a figment of economists’ imaginations........it is still too soon to tell if this will also be the case after the Great Recession. However, the risks of secular stagnation are much greater in depressed Eurozone economies than in the US, due to less favourable demographics, lower productivity growth, the burden of fiscal

On Jollibee, the Philippines, and diaspora economics

Over on my blog this evening, I noted that Philippines I based fast food chain Jollibee was set to open its first Canadian location later this year in Toronto. Apparently part of the chain's plans for global exchange expansion, with more locations slated to open up in the United States, Europe, Japan, and the Middle East, the Toronto restaurant is being created as part of a diaspora events red

The Economist

American families: Having it all, and then some

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; India’s one-man band Fly Title:&nbsp; American families Rubric:&nbsp; Why the best-educated women are opting for more children Location:&nbsp; WASHINGTON, DC IN 2007 Cathy McMorris Rodgers, a 37-year-old Republican congresswoman from Washington state, became the first woman in over a decade to give birth in office. In 2010 she had a second child, and in 2013 a third. That made her the first, and so far only, woman to give birth more than once while in Congress. Yet although her experience is rare among legislators, new data on births show that she is, in fact, rather typical of one category of American women. While the overall birth rate keeps declining, well-educated women seem to be having more children, not fewer. A new report from the Pew Research Centre, based on an analysis of census data, looks at women who have reached their mid-40s (when the vast majority of women stop having children) over the past two decades. It finds that the proportion of all women who ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Free exchange: Money for old folk

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; The dawn of artificial intelligence Fly Title:&nbsp; Free exchange Rubric:&nbsp; The relationship between ageing and inflation is not as simple as economists assume Main image:&nbsp; 20150509_fnd000.jpg WHEN it comes to the economic impact of demography, Japan is the wizened canary in the world’s coal mine. It has become older faster than any other big country: its median age went from 34 in 1980 to 46 today, and will continue rising for decades. But it will soon have plenty of greying company, from wealthy countries such as Finland and South Korea to developing giants, including China and Russia. Economists generally agree that the ageing of populations leads to slower growth, because a country’s potential output tends to fall as its labour force shrinks. They also expect heavier fiscal burdens, with governments providing for more pensioners from a smaller tax base. Until recently, though, there had been little research into how demography affects inflation. The ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

The marriage squeeze in India and China: Bare branches, redundant males

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Dynasties Fly Title:&nbsp; The marriage squeeze in India and China Rubric:&nbsp; Distorted sex ratios at birth a generation ago are changing marriage and damaging societies in Asia’s twin giants Main image:&nbsp; 20150418_ASP002_0.jpg Lucky man KHAPs are informal local councils in north-western India. They meet to lay down the law on questions of marriage and caste, and are among India’s most unflinchingly conservative institutions. They have banned marriage between people of different castes, restricted it between people from the same village and stand accused of ordering honour killings to enforce their rulings, which have no legal force. India’s Supreme Court once called for khaps to be “ruthlessly stamped out”. In April 2014, however, the Satrol khap, the largest in Haryana, one of India’s richest states, relaxed its ban on inter-caste marriage and made it easier for villagers to marry among their neighbours. “This will bring revolutionary change to Haryana,” said ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Portrait of Italy: Diversity, not disunity

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Fly Title:&nbsp; Portrait of Italy Rubric:&nbsp; Italy is a country with a great history and an uncertain future, troubled by low birth rates and high immigration. John Hooper&#039;s new book examines what makes this country tick Main image:&nbsp; 20150204_hooper_raw.jpg Published:&nbsp; 20150204 Source:&nbsp; Online extra Enabled <div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Free exchange: No country for young people

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Russia’s wounded economy Fly Title:&nbsp; Free exchange Rubric:&nbsp; Demography may explain secular stagnation IN THE late 1930s economists trying to explain how a depression could drag on for nearly a decade wondered if the problem was a shortage of people. “A change-over from an increasing to a declining population may be very disastrous,” said John Maynard Keynes in 1937.* The following year another prominent economist, Alvin Hansen, fretted that America was running out of people, territory and new ideas. The result, he said, was “secular stagnation—sick recoveries which die in their infancy and depressions which feed on themselves and leave a hard and seemingly immovable core of unemployment.” A year ago Larry Summers of Harvard University revived the term “secular stagnation” to describe the rich world’s prolonged malaise. Weak demand and excess savings were making it impossible to stimulate growth with the usual tool of low short-term interest rates, he argued. Demographics may play a central role in the ailment Mr Summers ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a &quot;Next Generation&quot; Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

INED partner of the cycle “Portraits de familles " [Portraits of families] of Paris ...

Can environmental migrations be measured?

Sea level rise, increasingly frequent and intense cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons—global warming suggests the likelihood of an entire set of environmental upsets occurring, particularly in coastal regions. The number of environmental migrants is therefore likely to rise, but it is difficult to estimate. In the latest issue of Population & Societies, Jacques Véron and Valérie Golaz explain why it is such a delicate matter to identify and quantify environmentally caused migrations, even after disasters like Hurricane Katrina and Fukushima

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]

Elections des représentants des personnels au Conseil national de l’enseignement supérieur ...