30 Apr 2017

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

What Is Hawaii?

It is the most diverse state in the nation and home to the United States Pacific Command, among other things.

Deadly Blast Near Lahore Targets Pakistan Census Workers

The explosion on the outskirts of the capital of Punjab Province killed four army soldiers, one air force member and a civilian, and it wounded at least 17.

The Best Cities to Find Single Men or Women

Here are the cities with the highest percentage of women and men among 100-major metro areas across the country.

Do You Think That in Your 20s You Will Live in a City?

Where do college graduates in their early 20s end up living, and why?

Growth of U.S. Population Is at Slowest Pace Since 1937

Census data reveal where people in America are moving (Utah), and where they are not (the Northeast).

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

Former MPIDR Director Joshua Goldstein elected to the American Academy

On April 12, former  MPIDR Director Joshua R. Goldstein was elected one of the 228 new members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

March for Science

On April 22, people around the world are heading to the streets to defend the value of research and science. The management and the board of directors of the MPIDR support this action. 

MPIDR at the Population Association of America Annual Meeting 2017

Several MPIDR researchers will present their work at the Meeting of the Population Association of America, which takes place in Chicago, Il, from April 27–29. The Institute will also have an exihibition booth.

Congratulations!

On April 6, MPIDR researcher Ralf Schaible successfully completed his habilitation at the University of Rostock.

The two-child ideal

Read in the new issue of "Demografische Forschung Aus Erster Hand" why many young people still want to have exactly two children and how much the cognitive performance of children born underweight has improved.

Demography Matters

Hans Rosling, in memoriam

I was shocked and saddened to learn of the death earlier this week of Gapminder's Hans Rosling. 68 was too young for anyone, certainly too young for someone so dedicated to helping the world know itself through the truth. Scott Gilmore's article in MacLean's is one I recommend. From Davos, to the White House, to the offices of the World Bank, Rosling could be found tirelessly preaching the

On Max Roser's A history of global living conditions in 5 charts and the future

Some days ago, I saw shared on Facebook an essay, Max Roser's "A history of global living conditions in 5 charts" at the Our World in Data project. In this essay, Roser makes the argument--contrary to the zeigeist of 2016--that, in fact, in the longue durée things have been getting decidedly better for people. Extreme poverty and premature mortality have faded, rates of literacy and education

Nature's Amy MaxMen on the achievements of Gapminder's Hans Rosling

In January 2011 and June 2013, I linked to two videos by Swedish statistician and popularizer Hans Rosling demonstrating different demographic trends. Today, via 3 Quarks Daily, I came across Amy Maxmen's excellent long-format article on Rosling and his accomplishments, "Three minutes with Hans Rosling will change your mind about the world". It does a great job of explaining just what Rosling,

"Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief"

Canadian newsmagazine MacLean's hosts Jordan Press' Canadian Press article "Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief". Wayne Smith warns that the Canadian census is still vulnerable to political interference, even with new legislation. The federal government’s bid to protect Statistics Canada from political interference has a significant oversight that exposes the census

The Globe and Mail on the Syrian refugee population in Canada

In The Globe and Mail, journalist Joe Friesen's data-driven analysis "Syrian exodus to Canada: One year later, a look at who the refugees are and where they went" takes a look at how the tens of thousands of Syrian refugees resettled Canada are doing. The initial surge of arrivals was fuelled primarily by privately sponsored refugees whose applications were already in the pipeline under the

The Economist

City of cars: Paying for public transport in Los Angeles

Print section Print Rubric:  The money for public transport is there, but plenty of barriers remain Print Headline:  City of cars Print Fly Title:  Transport in Los Angeles UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to have a better death Fly Title:  City of cars Location:  LOS ANGELES Main image:  20170429_usp507.jpg WHEN the Los Angeles transit authority extended a railway to link the city’s towering downtown to Santa Monica, a swanky seaside neighbourhood, last May, Angelenos rushed to experience it as if to glimpse a celebrity. For six decades, there had been no rail connection from the centre to the Westside beaches. So exciting was the concept that queues formed at 9.30am to catch the first train at noon. A year later Los Angeles is gearing up to build a rail link to the ...

Condoms v conservatives: The problems of family planning in Nigeria

Print section Print Rubric:  Faith and tradition favour high fertility. Education pulls the other way Print Headline:  Condoms v conservatives Print Fly Title:  Birth control in Nigeria UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to have a better death Fly Title:  Condoms v conservatives Location:  KADUNA Main image:  Not a plot Not a plot NOT everyone thinks birth control is a blessing. Boko Haram, a jihadist group that terrorises north-eastern Nigeria, deems artificial contraception to be a product of infidel learning, and therefore forbidden. Its ideologues also believe that females should avoid school, marry early (sometimes while still children) and have lots of babies. In the dwindling areas the jihadists control, women have no choice. Even outside those areas, contraception is ...

Fewer hombres: The big hole in Trump’s wall

Main image:  FEW of Donald Trump’s campaign promises are as memorable as his pledge to build a “big, beautiful wall” along America’s southern border. But while the planned barrier may play well with Mr Trump's base, it addresses a problem that has largely abated. Illegal immigration has been declining since 2007. A new study by economists Gordon Hanson, Chen Liu and Craig McIntosh of the University of California, San Diego argues that it will fall further still.During the economic boom of the 1990s and early 2000s, unauthorised immigrants, mainly from Mexico, flocked to America. The total number of undocumented immigrants rose from 3.5m in 1990 to a peak of 12.2m in 2007, but came to a halt after the financial crisis, according to The Pew Research Centre, a think-tank. Part of this decline has been a result of policy: the Obama administration made it a priority to stem the flow of immigrants, while also shielding long-term residents. But economic and demographic trends have also played a part. Flows of legal immigrants are largely fixed because of the visa system. In contrast, flows of illegal immigrants are more dependent on economic considerations. During the financial crisis in American, as wage growth slowed, Mexican workers with lower education levels had less reason to move north. Given ...

Fading echoes: East Germany’s population is shrinking

Print section Print Rubric:  Germany is running out of people, starting in the east Print Headline:  Fading echoes Print Fly Title:  Depopulation in Germany UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  As Turkey votes on a new constitution, it is sliding into dictatorship Fly Title:  Fading echoes Location:  BITTERFELD-WOLFEN Main image:  20170415_fnp502.jpg WERE it not for the graffiti on abandoned buildings, Bitterfeld-Wolfen, two towns north of Leipzig joined as one in 2007, would seem devoid of young people. Pharmacies, physiotherapy surgeries and shops selling garden gnomes line the sleepy streets. In its heyday the place had a booming chemical industry. Today “the air is much cleaner and we can finally hang out laundry,” says an elderly local out on a morning stroll. “But many jobs were lost ...

Daily chart: Migration and labour shortages in Asian countries

Main image:  THE Asian “model” of migration tends to be highly restrictive, and often appears more dedicated to stemming immigration than to managing it. The continent′s governments frequently curtail entry severely, strongly discourage permanent settlement and keep citizenship out of reach. Although Asia is home to half the world′s population, it provides only 34% of the total number of emigrants and hosts a mere 17% of immigrants. Just one-third of Asians who move abroad remain on the continent, and of those, most stick to neighbouring countries. This makes it hard to fill jobs in many countries where they are needed, despite a surplus of labour elsewhere. The imbalance of workers will only grow more dire as populations get greyer. For now, China is still a net exporter of labour. But during the next 30 years its working-age population is set to shrink by 180m, and it will need 20m more domestic workers. Overall, East Asia would have to import 275m people between the ages of 15 and 64 by 2030 to keep the share of its population at working age steady. Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and especially Thailand need workers, while Myanmar, Indonesia and the Philippines have too many. South Asia, meanwhile, could afford to lose 134m labourers—India alone could send more than 80m abroad—without worsening ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

Cécile Ventola soutiendra sa thèse le 15 mai 2017

Launch of the database LawsAndFamilies:same-sex couples and laws

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]