25 Feb 2017

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

The Best Cities to Find Single Men or Women

Here are the cities with the highest percentage of women and men among 100-major metro areas across the country.

Do You Think That in Your 20s You Will Live in a City?

Where do college graduates in their early 20s end up living, and why?

Growth of U.S. Population Is at Slowest Pace Since 1937

Census data reveal where people in America are moving (Utah), and where they are not (the Northeast).

Hispanic Surnames on the Rise in U.S. as Immigration Surges

The ascendancy of Lopez and Gonzalez reflects both the surge of immigrants from Latin America and the fact that Hispanic surnames tend to be less diverse.

With Fertility Rate in China Low, Some Press to Legalize Births Outside Marriage

The average Chinese woman has just 1.05 children, according to recently released findings from a government census.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

Racial Health Disparities in the United States

On February 28, 2017, Jay Kaufman from the McGill University, Montreal, Quebec will give a talk at the MPIDR entitled "Racial Health Disparities in the United States”.

New Media Library

Recently, we have put online our media library. You will find many graphics, created over the past years on the basis of MPIDR research results, as well as press pictures and flyers.

Health inequalities in Europe

On January 31, Johan Mackenbach from the Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, will give a talk at the MPIDR entitled "Health inequalities in Europe. New insights from comparative studies”.

Caravan of Science 2017

From January 11 to 24, the “Wissenskarawane” gives school students the opportunity to get insights into the research done at research institutes in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. On January 17, the MPIDR opens its doors to students.  

Less children per man than per woman

A new MPIDR study makes birthrates for men in Germany available for the first time. Men on average have less children then women and have them later in life. Differences are strongest in eastern Germany, where men set a new world record for low fertility.

Demography Matters

Hans Rosling, in memoriam

I was shocked and saddened to learn of the death earlier this week of Gapminder's Hans Rosling. 68 was too young for anyone, certainly too young for someone so dedicated to helping the world know itself through the truth. Scott Gilmore's article in MacLean's is one I recommend. From Davos, to the White House, to the offices of the World Bank, Rosling could be found tirelessly preaching the

On Max Roser's A history of global living conditions in 5 charts and the future

Some days ago, I saw shared on Facebook an essay, Max Roser's "A history of global living conditions in 5 charts" at the Our World in Data project. In this essay, Roser makes the argument--contrary to the zeigeist of 2016--that, in fact, in the longue durée things have been getting decidedly better for people. Extreme poverty and premature mortality have faded, rates of literacy and education

Nature's Amy MaxMen on the achievements of Gapminder's Hans Rosling

In January 2011 and June 2013, I linked to two videos by Swedish statistician and popularizer Hans Rosling demonstrating different demographic trends. Today, via 3 Quarks Daily, I came across Amy Maxmen's excellent long-format article on Rosling and his accomplishments, "Three minutes with Hans Rosling will change your mind about the world". It does a great job of explaining just what Rosling,

"Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief"

Canadian newsmagazine MacLean's hosts Jordan Press' Canadian Press article "Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief". Wayne Smith warns that the Canadian census is still vulnerable to political interference, even with new legislation. The federal government’s bid to protect Statistics Canada from political interference has a significant oversight that exposes the census

The Globe and Mail on the Syrian refugee population in Canada

In The Globe and Mail, journalist Joe Friesen's data-driven analysis "Syrian exodus to Canada: One year later, a look at who the refugees are and where they went" takes a look at how the tens of thousands of Syrian refugees resettled Canada are doing. The initial surge of arrivals was fuelled primarily by privately sponsored refugees whose applications were already in the pipeline under the

The Economist

Daily chart: Migration and labour shortages in Asian countries

Main image:  THE Asian “model” of migration tends to be highly restrictive, and often appears more dedicated to stemming immigration than to managing it. The continent′s governments frequently curtail entry severely, strongly discourage permanent settlement and keep citizenship out of reach. Although Asia is home to half the world′s population, it provides only 34% of the total number of emigrants and hosts a mere 17% of immigrants. Just one-third of Asians who move abroad remain on the continent, and of those, most stick to neighbouring countries. This makes it hard to fill jobs in many countries where they are needed, despite a surplus of labour elsewhere. The imbalance of workers will only grow more dire as populations get greyer. For now, China is still a net exporter of labour. But during the next 30 years its working-age population is set to shrink by 180m, and it will need 20m more domestic workers. Overall, East Asia would have to import 275m people between the ages of 15 and 64 by 2030 to keep the share of its population at working age steady. Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and especially Thailand need workers, while Myanmar, Indonesia and the Philippines have too many. South Asia, meanwhile, could afford to lose 134m labourers—India alone could send more than 80m abroad—without worsening ...

Monkey business: Understanding the spike in China’s birth rate

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Monkey business Location:  Beijing Main image:  20170128_cnp501.jpg WHEN China’s government scrapped its one-child policy in 2015, allowing all couples to have a second child, officials pooh-poohed Western demographers’ fears that the relaxation was too little, too late. Rather, the government claimed, the new approach would start to reverse the country’s dramatic ageing. On January 22nd the National Health and Family Planning Commission revealed data that seemed to justify optimism: it said 18.5m babies had been born in Chinese hospitals in 2016. This was the highest number since 2000—an 11.5% increase over 2015. Of the new babies, 45% were second children, up from around 30% before 2013, suggesting the policy change had made a difference. Confusingly, the National Bureau of Statistics announced its own figures at the same time: it said the number of births had risen by 8% to 17.9m (see chart). These numbers were based on a sample survey of the population, not hospital records, hence the ...

Daily chart: China’s spike in births will not alleviate its ageing problem

Main image:  CHINA is the most populous country in the world, but is also one of the fastest-ageing. So it was with some fanfare that the National Health and Family Planning Commission announced on January 22nd that the country’s birth rate shot up in 2016. Almost 18.5m babies were born last year, an annual jump of 11.5%. The National Bureau of Statistics also announced its own figures around the same time: it said the number of births had risen 8% to almost 18m, the highest number since 2000, and the biggest annual increase in three decades. These numbers are based on a sample survey of the population, not hospital records, hence the difference. Both are valid methodologies, and confirm the same trend. The spike comes on the heels of the country scrapping its long-standing one-child policy, though the number of births was already creeping up following a relaxation of the rules in 2013. The change in policy seems to have had an impact: some 45% of newborns last year were second children, compared with 30% before 2013. The commission estimates there will be 17m-20m births a year until 2020. Government officials now eagerly project that the rising birth rate could add 30m more people to the workforce by 2050.At first glance, this sum sounds enormous: it is roughly the entire population of Peru. ...

Gendercide: The war on baby girls winds down

Print section Print Rubric:  The war on baby girls has turned. Thank urbanisation, economics and soap operas Print Headline:  Boy trouble Print Fly Title:  Sex selection UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The 45th president Fly Title:  Gendercide Main image:  20170121_IRD001_0.jpg FOR something so private and covert, the selective abortion of female fetuses is an oddly common topic of conversation in India. Narendra Modi, the prime minister, exhorts his countrymen to save girls and send them to school. When Sakshi Malik won India’s first medal at the Rio Olympics, in wrestling, it was an occasion for regret as well as national chest-beating. Such victories are only possible when girls are not killed, commented Virender Sehwag, a dashing cricketer turned Twitter star. India has cause to fret. According to two demographers, John Bongaarts and Christophe ...

Demography and desire: The empty crib

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Brave new worlds Fly Title:  Demography and desire Location:  ATHENS, LAGOS AND MUMBAI Main image:  20160827_FBD001_0.jpg ALTHOUGH he recently lost his job, T. R. Seshadri is a contented middle-aged man. He rides a Royal Enfield motorbike and plays badminton every day. Two years ago he acquired a small flat on the outskirts of Mumbai, which he plans to rent out. Most satisfying of all, Mr Sesadri and his wife have two children, a boy and a girl—“the perfect combination”, he says. An only child does not learn to compromise, argues Mr Seshadri. A lone boy never has to wait for his sibling to leave the bathroom and never has to concede over which television programme to watch. But three children are too many in modern India. “If someone has a third child, people will think, what the hell is he doing?” he says. Some will scornfully ask: “Did you have two daughters first?” No—two is just right. Urban India played a starring role in “The ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]