28 Feb 2015

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

New York Rents Outpaced Inflation Over 3 Years, Census Data Say

A report from the Census Bureau shows that lower-income tenants continue to be caught in a housing squeeze that shows no signs of abating.

Census Bureau’s Plan to Cut Marriage and Divorce Questions Has Academics Up in Arms

Already, a series of unrelated policy decisions has reduced the ability to track family change in America.

Going Home From the South, a New Holiday Exodus

A surge of native Californians and Northeasterners who travel home from the South highlights its new role as a place to pursue the American dream.

Ceding to Florida, New York Falls to No. 4 in Population

With 19.7 million residents, New York now ranks behind California, Texas and Florida, according to new figures released by the United States Census Bureau.

The Rise of Men Who Don’t Work, and What They Do Instead

Young men work less. Older men work more. Here’s what happens at every age.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

Jeanne Calment - a puzzle of longevity

140 years ago, on February 21, 1875 Jeanne Calment was born in the town of Arles, southern France. She died in 1997 at the ripe age of 122, with the longest confirmed human lifespan at record. Why she lived that long is a puzzle to researchers.

Elderly with higher education are less likely to use long-term care

In a new study, MPIDR-researcher Olga Grigorieva has shown that people with higher education are less likely to use long-term care than people with lower education.

Welcome!

The MPIDR welcomes the new cohort of the MaxNetAging Research School. Since February 2, 2015 the 12 participants from six countries have been staying at the Institute for six months.

Congratulations!

On January 27 MPIDR-researcher Maarten Wensink has successfully defended his PhD thesis at the University of Leiden, Netherlands. In his dissertation he evaluated current theories on the evolutionary basis of aging.

Congratulations!

On January 8, 2015 former MPIDR-researcher Felix Rößger has successfully defended his PhD thesis at the University of Rostock. In his dissertation he focused on migration processes, taking a demographic perspective.

Demography Matters

Three links on African immigration to China

1. I'd like to point people towards Africans in China, a blog maintained by researcher Roberto Castillo. This blog concentrates on the African immigrant community in Guangzhou, its development and its issues. 2. Yucheng Liang's study "The causal mechanism of migration behaviors of African immigrants in Guangzhou: from the perspective of cumulative causation theory", published in 2014 in The

"Taiwan's Growing Multiculturalism"

Sinclaire Prowse's article in The Diplomat noting the continuing evolution of Taiwan, via international migration, into a more multicultural society is worth a read. A sample below: Migration trends over the past two decades have seen an impressive increase in the number of foreign permanent residents in Taiwan from 1,649 in 2005 to 10,811 at the end of 2014 (excluding residents from mainland

"Depopulation: An Investor's Guide to Value in the Twenty-First Century"

Earlier this month, Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen linked to an interesting-sounding new e-book available on the Amazon Kindle platform, Depopulation: An Investor's Guide to Value in the Twenty-First Century by Philip Auerswald and Joon Yun. Depopulation is a solid, inexpensive, and fairly quick read. Just 70 pages in length, Auerswald and Yun's e-book does what it promises in providing its

"A story of drinkers, genocide and unborn girls"

I wanted to briefly note that, over at Quartz, David Bauer has an interactive essay taking a look at the different factors in different areas of the world which lead to widely varying sex ratios. Female-selective abortion, male-heavy migration, changing patterns of life expectancy, demographic trends in the BRICs versus ost-Communist countries versus high-income countries--it's all there.

"A possible compromise on the census?"

Aaron Wherry of MacLean's notes the defeat of a parliamentarian's bill to reinstate Canada's long-form census, and notes said parliamentarian's proposed compromise. Ted Hsu’s bill to reinstate the mandatory long-form census was defeated last night by a vote of 147 to 126. Every opposition MP voted in favour, but nearly every Conservative voted against—Michael Chong was the only Conservative to

The Economist

Portrait of Italy: Diversity, not disunity

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Fly Title:&nbsp; Portrait of Italy Rubric:&nbsp; Italy is a country with a great history and an uncertain future, troubled by low birth rates and high immigration. John Hooper&#039;s new book examines what makes this country tick Main image:&nbsp; 20150204_hooper_raw.jpg Published:&nbsp; 20150204 Source:&nbsp; Online extra Enabled <div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Free exchange: No country for young people

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Russia’s wounded economy Fly Title:&nbsp; Free exchange Rubric:&nbsp; Demography may explain secular stagnation IN THE late 1930s economists trying to explain how a depression could drag on for nearly a decade wondered if the problem was a shortage of people. “A change-over from an increasing to a declining population may be very disastrous,” said John Maynard Keynes in 1937.* The following year another prominent economist, Alvin Hansen, fretted that America was running out of people, territory and new ideas. The result, he said, was “secular stagnation—sick recoveries which die in their infancy and depressions which feed on themselves and leave a hard and seemingly immovable core of unemployment.” A year ago Larry Summers of Harvard University revived the term “secular stagnation” to describe the rich world’s prolonged malaise. Weak demand and excess savings were making it impossible to stimulate growth with the usual tool of low short-term interest rates, he argued. Demographics may play a central role in the ailment Mr Summers ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Daily chart: The end of the population pyramid

The shape of the world's demography is changing Comment Expiry Date:&nbsp; Wed, 2014-12-03 <div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Population projections: Don’t panic

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Fly Title:&nbsp; Population projections Rubric:&nbsp; A UN study sparks fears of a population explosion. The alarm is misplaced Main image:&nbsp; 20140927_BLP508_0.jpg “BOOM! Earth’s population could hit 12 billion by 2100”.&nbsp;That was the headline on Wired.com which greeted research by Patrick Gerland and others of the United Nations’ population division looking at the UN’s population projections to 2100. Britain’s Guardian newspaper said the study, published recently in the journal Science, “overturns 20 years of consensus on peak projection of 9 billion and gradual decline.” Climate News Network, a non-governmental organisation that tracks and summarises environmental articles, reckoned the study “has profound and alarming implications for political stability, food security and, of course, climate change.” But hang on a second. The UN’s population division is the outfit that much of the world relies on for basic demographic information. If it had changed its forecasts and overturned 20 years of consensus, that would be a very big deal ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Birth control in Niger: Population explosion

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Back to Iraq Fly Title:&nbsp; Birth control in Niger Rubric:&nbsp; Runaway birth rates are a disaster Location:&nbsp; MARADI Main image:&nbsp; 20140816_MAP006_1.jpg HAOWA was already struggling to feed five children before she gave birth to triplets in the Gabi region of southern Niger 19 months ago. Now, when her babies scream for food she often finds herself helpless. “If they cry and I have nothing to give them, then I must let them cry,” she says, cradling two infants who bear the hallmarks of malnutrition. Their hair is yellowing, their bellies are distended and their expressions glazed. They lack the energy to shake the flies from their faces. It is a dismal but depressingly common picture in west Africa’s largest country. Niger is, by the reckoning of the UN’s Human Development Index, the poorest place on earth. Most of its inhabitants eke out a living growing subsistence crops on small plots of dusty, ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Urban Institute

The CUNY Fatherhood Academy: A Qualitative Evaluation

Knowing the economic challenges young fathers without postsecondary education face in providing for their families, New York City's Young Men's Initiative launched a fatherhood program housed in LaGuardia Community College in spring 2012. The CUNY Fatherhood Academy (CFA) aims to connect young fathers to academic and employment opportunities while supporting them through parenting classes and workshops. This report summarizes Urban Institute's qualitative evaluation of the program. The evaluation, completed under contract with the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity, focuses on CFA's design, implementation, and participant outcomes in the four cohorts served between March 2012 and December 2013.

The CUNY Fatherhood Academy: A Qualitative Evaluation : Executive Summary

Knowing the economic challenges young fathers without postsecondary education face in providing for their families, New York City's Young Men's Initiative launched a fatherhood program housed in LaGuardia Community College in spring 2012. The CUNY Fatherhood Academy (CFA) aims to connect young fathers to academic and employment opportunities while supporting them through parenting classes and workshops. This executive summary provides highlights from Urban Institute's qualitative evaluation of the program. The evaluation, completed under contract with the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity, focuses on CFA's design, implementation, and participant outcomes in the four cohorts served between March 2012 and December 2013.

The Promise of Early Interventions for Improving Socioeconomic Outcomes of Black Men

This brief uses the Social Genome Model to assess the potential impact of various childhood and adolescent interventions on long-term outcomes for black men. In particular, we see that increasing parental emotional support and cognitive stimulation during early childhood and raising reading ability levels in mid-childhood have the greatest impact on later life educational attainment and income. The overall effects of successful interventions are modest for the entire population of black men but are somewhat larger for individuals that would be directly affected by the interventions. Our findings suggest that making substantial progress in improving the outcomes of black men will likely require many different interventions that reinforce one another throughout the life course.

Promoting Healthy Families and Communities for Boys and Young Men of Color

Boys and young men of color are at risk for poor health and developmental outcomes from birth through young adulthood. Many risks flow from a lack of economic resources and residence in segregated neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. This paper outlines these developmental challenges and identifies societal, institutional, and community changes that would increase resources, eliminate or reduce stress and trauma, and provide support for boys and families. It also identifies some knowledge gaps that must be filled in order to increase the effectiveness of programs directed toward this population.

Reducing Harms to Boys and Young Men of Color from Criminal Justice System Involvement

Boys and young men of color are overrepresented in all aspects of the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems, at considerable cost to those involved, their families, and their communities. This overrepresentation is most acute for African Americans, although other communities of color are also affected. This paper reviews systemic, institutional, and community policies and practices that greatly impact the life chances of boys and young men of color. Policy and practice changes that would reduce criminal justice engagement and that would reduce the harms caused to communities of color from criminal justice engagement are identified and suggestions are made for developing more evidence of effectiveness for initiatives in this area.

INED

Intercountry adoptions across the world: why are they declining?

The number of intercountry adoptions in both France and across the world is about one-third what it was ten years ago. The latest issue of Population & Societies measures this decline and analyses the reasons for it. Fewer minors are now available for intercountry adoption; due to the spread of contraception and abortion, falling mortality, rising living standards and the development of family and social policy, the number of orphans and abandoned children has fallen and improved arrangements are in place for those who remain. Also, intercountry adoption is now more strictly regulated. Today, most adoptees from abroad are older than previously, they are adopted together with siblings or have a disease or disability. In France 1,343 children were adopted from abroad in 2013. One in three was over five years of age, and one in four had a disease or disability.

Living arrangements of children after divorce in France (INSEE Première)

After divorce, three out of four children in France live with their mother, but split custody is making headway. The February issue of “INSEE Première,” co-authored by INED researchers Carole Bonnet and Anne Solaz together with Bertrand Garbinti of INSEE-CREST, analyses changes in the living conditions of 160,000 minors whose parents divorced or ended their civil union in 2009. In the year following parents’ separation, fewer than one in ten children (9%) were in father’s exclusive custody. Split custody arrangements now account for 15% of cases; this solution is more often chosen by well-off families. While half of the children of divorce in France change residences, the vast majority remain in the same département. In 50% of divorces, the court imposes child support. [FR]

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]