17 Apr 2015

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

Maryland: Census Bureau Guard Is Critically Wounded

A gunman shot and critically wounded a guard at the Census Bureau headquarters on Thursday before leading the police on a chase that reportedly ended with the suspect and an officer wounded.

The Giant Retirement Community That Explains Where Americans Are Moving

The Villages area in Florida shows that warmth and affordable housing have helped a pre-recession population trend reassert itself.

Letter From the Editor: Illuminating Gay America

Until the census asks about subjects like sexual orientation, we’ll have to rely on other sources of data to understand the country’s full demographics.

Don’t Starve the Census

The call for budget cuts by some Republicans would impair the agency’s already strained ability to gather data.

New York Rents Outpaced Inflation Over 3 Years, Census Data Say

A report from the Census Bureau shows that lower-income tenants continue to be caught in a housing squeeze that shows no signs of abating.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

The world after the change

Read in the new issue of “Demografische Forschung Aus Erster Hand“ why retirees today are much more active than in the past and what advantages demographic change could bring us.

Congratulations!

On April 13 Felix Ringelhan, a doctoral student at the MPIDR, has successfully defended his PhD. His dissertation focused on the aging processes of various basal animals, particularly Cnidaria.

Six Outstanding Problems in Developing Country Demography

On April 14 demographer and statistician Griffith Feeney will give a lecture at the MPIDR. In his talk he will address problems demographers face when investigating demographic issues in developing countries.

Congratulations!

Former MPIDR-researcher Anne-Kristin Kuhnt has received a prize for young researchers at this year’s Annual Meeting of the German Society for Demography (DGD).

Jeanne Calment - a puzzle of longevity

140 years ago, on February 21, 1875 Jeanne Calment was born in the town of Arles, southern France. She died in 1997 at the ripe age of 122, with the longest confirmed human lifespan at record. Why she lived that long is a puzzle to researchers.

Demography Matters

Population Ageing and Global Externalities - What if QE is not temporary?

This post first appeared on Alpha.Sources, but given the arrival of Ben Bernanke to the world of econ blogging and the interaction between him, Krugman and Summers, I would it would be interesting to highlight it to DM's readers too. This discussion of market failures and externalities is mostly a microeconomic discussion. Students will tend to encounter it, in the context of the classic case of

On cat islands and the wider potential of rewilding

I'm still fond of a old post of mine that I had made back in January 2011, "What the cats of Houtong say about the population of Taiwan". That post, drawing on a September 2010 post I made at my blog, examined how the Taiwanese village of Houtong, located just outside the capital of Taipei, has managed to find new life after its coal mining economy went under thanks to its large feral cat

On the transformation of Canada's temporary foreign worker program

Today in Canada is a notable day in Canada's immigration history, for today is the day that changes in the Temporary Foreign Worker program are going to have a significant but as yet uncertain effect on the lives of people in the Canadian labour market. David P. Ball's article in British Columbian newsmagazine The Tyee, "Foreign Worker Exodus Expected as New Rules Kick in" outlines the situation

Is Finland's Economy Suffering From Secular Stagnation?

"After the Great Depression, secular stagnation turned out to be a figment of economists’ imaginations........it is still too soon to tell if this will also be the case after the Great Recession. However, the risks of secular stagnation are much greater in depressed Eurozone economies than in the US, due to less favourable demographics, lower productivity growth, the burden of fiscal

On Jollibee, the Philippines, and diaspora economics

Over on my blog this evening, I noted that Philippines I based fast food chain Jollibee was set to open its first Canadian location later this year in Toronto. Apparently part of the chain's plans for global exchange expansion, with more locations slated to open up in the United States, Europe, Japan, and the Middle East, the Toronto restaurant is being created as part of a diaspora events red

The Economist

The marriage squeeze in India and China: Bare branches, redundant males

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Dynasties Fly Title:&nbsp; The marriage squeeze in India and China Rubric:&nbsp; Distorted sex ratios at birth a generation ago are changing marriage and damaging societies in Asia’s twin giants Main image:&nbsp; 20150418_ASP002_0.jpg Lucky man KHAPs are informal local councils in north-western India. They meet to lay down the law on questions of marriage and caste, and are among India’s most unflinchingly conservative institutions. They have banned marriage between people of different castes, restricted it between people from the same village and stand accused of ordering honour killings to enforce their rulings, which have no legal force. India’s Supreme Court once called for khaps to be “ruthlessly stamped out”. In April 2014, however, the Satrol khap, the largest in Haryana, one of India’s richest states, relaxed its ban on inter-caste marriage and made it easier for villagers to marry among their neighbours. “This will bring revolutionary change to Haryana,” said ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Portrait of Italy: Diversity, not disunity

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Fly Title:&nbsp; Portrait of Italy Rubric:&nbsp; Italy is a country with a great history and an uncertain future, troubled by low birth rates and high immigration. John Hooper&#039;s new book examines what makes this country tick Main image:&nbsp; 20150204_hooper_raw.jpg Published:&nbsp; 20150204 Source:&nbsp; Online extra Enabled <div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Free exchange: No country for young people

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Issue:&nbsp; Russia’s wounded economy Fly Title:&nbsp; Free exchange Rubric:&nbsp; Demography may explain secular stagnation IN THE late 1930s economists trying to explain how a depression could drag on for nearly a decade wondered if the problem was a shortage of people. “A change-over from an increasing to a declining population may be very disastrous,” said John Maynard Keynes in 1937.* The following year another prominent economist, Alvin Hansen, fretted that America was running out of people, territory and new ideas. The result, he said, was “secular stagnation—sick recoveries which die in their infancy and depressions which feed on themselves and leave a hard and seemingly immovable core of unemployment.” A year ago Larry Summers of Harvard University revived the term “secular stagnation” to describe the rich world’s prolonged malaise. Weak demand and excess savings were making it impossible to stimulate growth with the usual tool of low short-term interest rates, he argued. Demographics may play a central role in the ailment Mr Summers ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Daily chart: The end of the population pyramid

The shape of the world's demography is changing Comment Expiry Date:&nbsp; Wed, 2014-12-03 <div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Population projections: Don’t panic

UK Only Article:&nbsp; standard article Fly Title:&nbsp; Population projections Rubric:&nbsp; A UN study sparks fears of a population explosion. The alarm is misplaced Main image:&nbsp; 20140927_BLP508_0.jpg “BOOM! Earth’s population could hit 12 billion by 2100”.&nbsp;That was the headline on Wired.com which greeted research by Patrick Gerland and others of the United Nations’ population division looking at the UN’s population projections to 2100. Britain’s Guardian newspaper said the study, published recently in the journal Science, “overturns 20 years of consensus on peak projection of 9 billion and gradual decline.” Climate News Network, a non-governmental organisation that tracks and summarises environmental articles, reckoned the study “has profound and alarming implications for political stability, food security and, of course, climate change.” But hang on a second. The UN’s population division is the outfit that much of the world relies on for basic demographic information. If it had changed its forecasts and overturned 20 years of consensus, that would be a very big deal ...<div class="og_rss_groups"></div>

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a &quot;Next Generation&quot; Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]

Ined partenaire du cycle « Portraits de familles » de Paris Bibliothèques

First cohabiting relationships: recent trends in France

Living together without being married—inconceivable in the 1950s—is now quite common. But people’s first experience of cohabitation in France has changed over the generations. Wilfried Rault and Arnaud Régnier-Loilier present those changes in the latest issue of Population & Societies, drawing on the initial findings of the EPIC study of individual and conjugal trajectories, a major survey conducted by INED and INSEE. With longer education and rising unemployment, today’s young people are starting to live together at a later age than their predecessors, although age at first cohabitation union has remained steady for the most recent cohorts. Moving in together no longer coincides with sexual debut; young people now rarely cohabit with their first sexual partner. Nor does living together necessarily mean starting a family: among young people—who are increasingly likely to be students¬—the first cohabiting relationship is more like an experiment than a complete way of life.

Un enfant toujours plus tard

Le 18 Avril 2015, conférence-débat avec France Prioux à la bibliothèque Robert Sabatier (Paris 18) - Cycle Portraits de famille

Trends and risk factors for prison suicide in France

Prisoners commit suicide in France seven times more often than non-prisoners. Which inmates are most vulnerable? In an article published in the journal Population, INED researcher Géraldine Duthé and Angélique Hazard and Annie Kensey from the Direction de l’Administration Pénitentiare (national prison administration department) show that suicide risk is twice as high for pre-trial detainees—particularly hard hit by sudden incarceration and the stress of uncertainty about a possible conviction—as for other prisoners.