20 May 2018

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

Zuckerberg Continues His Apology Tour and Strict Privacy Rules Arrive in the E.U.

Also, a public comment period on proposed tariffs on Chinese imports ends, and Disney tries to kick a Memorial Day slump with a new “Star Wars” movie.

I Am Not a Mother. But I Am Something.

The ways we create families, and the roles we play in them, are growing. But the language to describe them isn’t.

Census Officials Say Rhode Island Rehearsal Is Going Well. Not Everyone Agrees.

The sole dry run for the 2020 census is happening in Providence, where a publicity blitz has already been canceled for lack of funds.

Cities and States Mount Court Challenge to Census Question on Citizenship

Opponents say the question will deter immigrants from participating in the 2020 tally, thwarting the Constitution’s mandate to conduct an accurate count.

How Trump’s Citizenship Question May Hurt the G.O.P.

Everyone in an area that loses numbers also loses clout and cash — that includes red states like Texas.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

Prize award for a MPIDR paper

On March 9, a paper published in the PNAS by MPIDR director Mikko Myrskylä and Alice Goisis and Berkay Özcan from the London School of Economics on low birth weight and cognitive development has been awarded a prize.

3rd Human Fertility Database Symposium

The MPIDR and the Vienna Institute of Demography invite to submit contributions to the 3rd Human Fertility Database Symposium. Deadline for abstract submission is June 1.

New Chief Research Coordinator

On February 15, Beatrice Michaelis takes over the management of the Institute. Previously, the 38-year-old coordinated the Max Planck International Research Network on Aging (MaxNetAging) for almost two years.

Does migration contribute to African epidemics?

On February 27, Philippe Bocquier from the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium, will give a talk at the MPIDR about internal migration effects on AIDS, tuberculosis and non-communicable disease mortality in Kenya and South Africa.

Emilio Zagheni is new MPIDR director

Emilio Zagheni has been appointed new director of the MPIDR. The 36-year old Italian will head the Institute jointly with Mikko Myrskylä. One of Zagheni’s research priorities will be migration.

Demography Matters

On the unreality of imagining chain migration to be a bad thing

I have been paying attention to the world, as best as I can; I have been paying attention to demographics, though sadly not here. (Looking at the posts gathered together in the "Demographics" category at my blog, A Bit More Detail, should give you an idea as to what I've been watching.) I have not, for reasons including my mixed unhappiness and concern and confusion at ongoing trends in American

On the demographic issues of Puerto Rico in an era of exodus

I was reminded of my post questioning the viability of Caribbean islands in an era of worsening natural disasters when I began reading reports of the devastation wrought on Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria. Hurricane Maria is Puerto Rico’s worst in nearly a century, a double blow as it follows the destructive Hurricane Irma by just two weeks. The costs, both human and financial, have only begun to

What demographic issues do you think deserve coverage?

I know I ask this periodically of our readership, but I remain curious. What population-issues do you think should be covered, here or elsewhere? Are there particular regions or particular themes you would like explored? (I can promise a post on Puerto Rico for tomorrow. More to come after that, too.)

On a devastating hurricane season in the Caribbean and migration futures

Hurricane season this year in the Caribbean is shaping up to be terrible. I had not quite realized how terrible, the imagery of devastation aside, until I learned that the devastation wrought by Hurricane Irma had forced the evacuation of Barbuda, smaller of the two major islands which make up the country of Antigua and Barbuda. The island has been emptied of its population of some eighteen

On the labour shortages of Sarufutsu, Hokkaido

Late last month, I came across Masahiro Hidaka's Bloomberg article "Japan's Richest Village Can't Find Workers for Its Factory". In this article, Hidaka describes how the village of Sarufutsu, northernmost village in Hokkaido and thus all Japan, is facing a shutdown of its hugely profitable scallops fishery because it is literally running out of workers. The village -- which is closer to the

The Economist

All in the family: Consanguineous marriages are declining

Print section Print Rubric:  The practice of cousin marriage is doomed Print Headline:  All in the family Print Fly Title:  Consanguineous marriage UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A looser knot Fly Title:  All in the family Main image:  20171125_BLP506.jpg CHARLES DARWIN MARRIED his cousin, and may have regretted it. The great scientist’s experiments on plants later convinced him of the “evil effects” of persistent inbreeding. In 1870 he wrote to an MP, suggesting that the upcoming national census ask parents whether they were blood relatives. For, as he noted, consanguineous marriages were commonly said to produce children who suffered from “deafness and dumbness, blindness &c”. Darwin’s request was turned down. Britain did not start keeping records of marriages between first cousins, nor did it ban the practice, as some American states were ...

The Balkanisation of the bedroom: China’s demographic divisions are getting deeper

Print section Print Rubric:  In demographic terms, China’s provinces are becoming ever more disparate Print Headline:  Ups and downs Print Fly Title:  Fertility and migration UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Jeremy Corbyn: Britain’s most likely next prime minister Fly Title:  The Balkanisation of the bedroom Location:  BEIJING Main image:  20170923_CNP002_0.jpg IF DEMOGRAPHY is destiny, as Auguste Comte, a French philosopher, once said, then China has many destinies. As a result of 30 years of the now-relaxed one-child policy, the country has an exceptionally low overall fertility rate: 1.2 according to the census of 2010. (The fertility rate is the number of children an average woman can expect to bear during her lifetime. If it is less than 2.1 a population will shrink in the long ...

Generation games: Great strides have been made against disease and poverty

Print section Print Rubric:  The past 15 years have seen spectacular falls in poverty and ill health. The next 15 are unlikely to be as good Print Headline:  Generation games Print Fly Title:  The Gates report UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Closing in on cancer Fly Title:  Generation games Main image:  20170916_irp002.jpg IF YOU look beyond the rich West, most of which has been in a funk ever since the financial crisis of 2007-08, the world has had an amazing run. Fully 6m fewer children under the age of five died in 2016 than in 1990. Never before have so many people been free of grinding poverty and ill health. Never have women been so unlikely to die as a result of giving birth, or to lose a baby to illness. But the possibility that after this long winning streak humanity could be about to trip and fall is preoccupying Bill and Melinda Gates, a ...

Daily chart: Wealth alone cannot account for Europe’s low birth rates

Main image:  JULIAN ASSANGE, the founder of WikiLeaks and apparently an amateur demographer, is worried about Europe’s declining birth rate. In a recent tweet he posited that “Capitalism + atheism + feminism = sterility = migration”, and noted that the leaders of Britain, France, Germany and Italy are all childless.Never mind that Mr Assange needs a dictionary. “Sterility” means the inability to play a part in conception (often for medical reasons, or because a man has had a vasectomy or a woman has had her Fallopian tubes tied). What he presumably meant was childlessness, or perhaps a preference for fewer children—a preference, moreover, that until the advent of modern contraception women might hold but could not act on. Mr Assange’s tweet echoed sentiments expressed by RT (formerly Russia Today), a Kremlin-backed news organisation. Russian propagandists have long argued that the West’s declining fertility rate is evidence of its decline. A recent RT editorial claimed that “Europe has been committing protracted demographic suicide for several decades.” (Russia’s own fertility rate stands at 1.8 births per woman, not much above the western European average of 1.6.)Critics responded sharply to Mr Assange’s tweet, countering that a country’s birth rate depends largely on how rich it is. But is there ...

Daily chart: Immigrants boost America’s birth rate

Main image:  POLITICS and sheer hatred aside, there is no shortage of blind spots in the rationale behind America’s mounting restrictions on immigration. Immigrants are a boon to America in many ways. For one, they do plenty of jobs that native-born Americans shun—including what most parents would agree is the ultimate labour of love: having babies.For decades America’s birth rate has been stuck below the level at which a given generation replaces itself. This means that without a steady influx of young migrants down the line there will be fewer working-age people supporting a greater number of retirees. But according to analysis published earlier this week by the Pew Research Centre in Washington, DC, things would have been worse if it weren’t for immigrants. They make up 13% of the population but nearly a quarter of births in 2015 were to immigrant women.They have slowed the decrease in the number of babies born in America. This is because they have higher fertility rates than natives and make up a growing share of women of childbearing age. Between 1990 and 2015 births shrunk by 4%. Without immigrant women, the drop would have been more than twice as large. That is not a trend confined to just some parts of America. In all but two of America’s 50 states, immigrants boosted the overall number ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

Migration, Environment and Climate:What risk inequalities?

Call for papers

EUROPEAN POPULATION CONFERENCE 2018

EPC INED Researchers participation

Doctoral Day 2018

registration strongly encouraged

The health transition in a century of political upheaval: the case of the Baltic countries

Population and Societies n° 555, May 2018

Les formations Résodémo 2018

8 formations thématiques et techniques sont proposées