28 Jul 2014

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


U.S. Census Bureau News - Population

As the Nation Ages, Seven States Become Younger, Census Bureau Reports

The median age declined in seven states between 2012 and 2013, including five in the Great Plains, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released today. In contrast, the median age for the U.S. as a whole ticked up from 37.5 years to 37.6 years. These estimates examine population changes among ...

Media Advisory -- Census Bureau Will Embargo Population Estimates for the Nation, States, Counties and Puerto Rico by Age, Sex, Race and Hispanic Origin

The U.S. Census Bureau will offer a two-day embargo for members of the media to view the latest population estimates for the nation, states, counties and Puerto Rico by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin. The 2013 population estimates will be posted to the Census Bureau's embargo site at 10 ...

Story Maps Illustrate Metro Area and County Population Change

The U.S. Census Bureau today released two interactive thematic maps on population change. "These 'Story Maps' provide insight on emerging trends in population change across the country," said Jason Devine of the Census Bureau's Population Division. The first map shows the difference a decade has made in population change patterns ...

South, West Have Fastest-Growing Cities, Census Bureau Reports; Three of Top 10 are in Texas Capital Area

Austin has been the capital of Texas since 1839, and in 2013 the area became the nation's capital for population growth, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released today. San Marcos, Cedar Park and Georgetown — each near Austin — ranked among the 10 fastest-growing cities with populations of ...

Media Advisory -- New Subcounty Population and Housing Unit Estimates to be Embargoed

The U.S. Census Bureau will offer a two-day embargo period next week for embargo subscribers to view the 2013 population estimates for all local governmental units, including incorporated places, minor civil divisions and consolidated cities. Housing estimates will be released for the nation, states and counties. The 2013 subcounty population ...

U.S. Census Bureau News - American Community Survey (ACS)

Walking to Work Remains Unchanged from 2000

The Census Bureau's most recent report, "Modes Less Traveled — Bicycling and Walking to Work in the United States: 2008-2012," shows that walking to work has remained unchanged since 2000 after steadily decreasing since 1980. In 1980, 5.6 percent of workers walked to work, and that rate declined to ...

Census Bureau Reports 1.7 percent of Workers Commute by Bike in Boston

Boston had among the highest percent of commuters who bike to work, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today in a new brief focused on biking and walking to work. Nationally, 0.6 percent of workers commute by bike. Since 2000, the percent of people who biked to work in Boston ...

Census Bureau Reports 1.3 percent of Workers Commute by Bike in Chicago

Chicago had 1.3 percent of commuters bike to work, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today in a new brief focused on biking and walking to work. Nationally, 0.6 percent of workers commute by bike. Since 2000, the percent of people who biked to work in Chicago increased from 0.5 ...

Census Bureau Reports 1.0 percent of Workers Commute by Bike in Los Angeles

Los Angeles had 1.0 percent of commuters bike to work, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today in a new brief focused on biking and walking to work. Nationally, 0.6 percent of workers commute by bike. Since 2000, the percent of people who biked to work in Los Angeles increased from ...

Census Bureau Reports 4.1 percent of Workers Commute by Bike in Minneapolis

Minneapolis had among the highest percent of commuters who bike to work, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today in a new brief focused on biking and walking to work. Nationally, 0.6 percent of workers commute by bike. Since 2000, the percent of people who biked to work in Minneapolis ...

NYT > Census

In U.S. Data, a Baffling Contradiction

The government says that the first quarter of 2014 was the worst for the economy since 2009, but the best in hiring in over six years. How can both reports be right?

Class-Action Suit Can Proceed Against Census

A magistrate judge on Tuesday certified the suit, which alleges that the Census Bureau’s use of criminal background checks for part-time workers unlawfully screened out 250,000 African-Americans.

Census Considers How to Measure a More Diverse America

For many Hispanics and Arab-Americans, changes in questions on census forms could elicit more accurate portrayals of their backgrounds.

Census Estimates Show Another Increase in New York City’s Non-Hispanic White Population

In a city that had experienced decades of white flight, a tiny shift toward racial equilibrium is seen.

G.A.O. Tech Chief Says Washington Should Start Small on Big Projects

David A. Powner, the Government Accountability Office’s IT director, says the failure of many U.S. tech projects is owed to an inability to launch beta projects and continue to iterate.

demography.matters.blog

On the longevity and extended health of Icarians, among others

Via the Washington Post I came across a 2012 article in The New York Times Magazine by Dan Buettner, "The Island Where People Forget to Die". In this article, Buettner highlights the longevity and good health of the inhabitants of Icaria, a small Greek island in the Aegean Sea several dozen kilometres away from the Anatolian mainland where the average inhabitant can expect to live a decade longer

Secular Stagnation Part II - On Bubble Business Bound

"I now suspect that the kind of moderate economic policy regime...... that by and large lets markets work, but in which the government is ready both to rein in excesses and fight slumps – is inherently unstable." Paul Krugman - The Instability of Moderation "Conventional macreconomic theory leaves us in a very serious problem, because we all seem to agree that whereas you can keep the federal

The "Hot Labour" Phenomenon

Strong growth. Rising real estate prices. Rapid job creation. Surging immigration. This list sums up the Switzerland of 2014 down to a tee. However, it also sounds like a description of what things were like in Spain in 2007 - shortly before the country's economy fell off a cliff. What follows is a conversation between financial journalist Detlef Gürtler and economist and crisis expert Edward

On the demographic background behind the Ontario election tomorrow

Tomorrow, the Canadian province of Ontario will go through an election. The Liberal minority government failed to get the support of the left-wing NDP in passing its provincial budget, triggering an election. Right now, the parties seem tied; the election can go any way. (I myself intend to turn up at the polls in my riding, or electoral district, of Davenport and vote for the Liberal candidate;

Secular Stagnation Part 1 - Paul Krugman's Bicycling Problem

"What’s really happening fast is the demographic transition, with Europe very quickly turning Japanese." Paul Krugman - For Bonds, This Time is Different Ever since Larry Summers gave his game-changing speech at last autumn's IMF research conference the back-and-forth flow of arguments about secular stagnation has been almost non-stop (indeed Larry himself now has a webpage dedicated to the

Demography

The Economist explains: Why the Japanese are having so few babies

LAST month a local official in Aichi prefecture set out a daring proposal. Tomonaga Osada suggested that the authorities could distribute secretly punctured condoms to young married couples, who would then get to work boosting the birth rate. His unorthodox ploy won few supporters, yet it reflects a gathering concern about Japan’s demographic plight. Last year just over 1m babies were born, far fewer than the number needed to maintain the population, which is expected to drop from 127m to around 87m by 2060. Why are young Japanese so loth to procreate?The spiral of demographic decline is spinning faster as the number of women of child-bearing age falls. In May a report predicted that 500 or more towns across the country will disappear by around 2040 as young women migrate to bigger cities. The workforce is already shrinking, imperiling future growth. In recent years governments have embarked on a plethora of schemes to encourage childbearing, including a “women’s handbook” to educate young females on the high and low points of their fertility, and state-sponsored matchmaking events.The chief reason for the dearth of births is the decline of marriage. Fewer people are opting to wed, and they are doing so later in life. At least a third of young women aim to become full-time housewives, yet they struggle to find men who can support a traditional family. In ...

Fertility and son-preference in Nigeria: Bring back the girls

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  America’s lost oomph Fly Title:  Fertility and son-preference in Nigeria Rubric:  Amid worries about kidnapped girls, Nigeria’s traditions are unkind, too Main image:  Still the desirable sex SEX-SELECTIVE abortions are used round the world to discriminate in favour of boys. But not in Africa. Nigeria’s sex ratio at birth is the natural one: 106 boys are born for every 100 girls (boys are more vulnerable to infant diseases, so this ratio ensures that equal numbers of the sexes reach puberty). By contrast, at its worst, China had 120 boys for every 100 girls. Moreover, in Nigeria, there are plenty of both: the fertility rate is 6.0, meaning the average woman can expect to have six children, or three sons. Parents have no need of extra measures to ensure boys are born. Yet despite all this, a recent study* finds that Nigeria also suffers from sexual bias from birth and that, while this does not skew the sex ratio, it manifests itself in other ways that harm ...

Iran: Make more babies

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Beautiful game, dirty business Fly Title:  Iran Rubric:  Iran’s leaders are worried about their country’s declining population Location:  TEHRAN Main image:  There’s still room for another There’s still room for another “DECIDE tonight to rid yourselves of this ominous culture of having only one or two children,” intones a leading cleric on a state-run television programme, appealing to viewers to have at least five babies to match the Prophet Muhammad’s immediate family (himself, his daughter Fatima, his cousin and son-in-law Ali, and his two grandsons Hassan and Hussein—known together as “the people of the cloak”). But ideally you should aim for 12, the number of imams historically worshipped by Shia Muslims, who predominate in Iran. “Nothing less than five is acceptable,” he insists. From mullahs to health ministers, the Islamic Republic is changing its tune on family planning. In 2012 ...

Demography: Quality time

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Bucked off Fly Title:  Demography Rubric:  Why shrinking populations may be no bad thing Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. FATHER, mother and two children: surely the perfect family size. For those concerned, it is neither too big nor too small. For the national economy, it ensures that two new workers will replace the parents in the labour force. And eventually the children will have children of their own and keep the population stable. For that happy state to be achieved, the “total fertility rate” (a measure used by demographers for the number of children a woman is likely to have during her childbearing years) needs to be above two: around 2.1 in the rich world and more in poorer countries, because some children, particularly in the developing world, die before adulthood. For many years the United Nations’ population forecasts—the gold standard in the demography business—have assumed that, in the long run, fertility the world over would converge on the replacement ...

Scottish independence: The oracle of Holyrood

UK Only Article:  UK article only Issue:  Bucked off Fly Title:  Scottish independence Rubric:  Alex Salmond’s long-term forecasts for an independent Scotland look far too optimistic Main image:  20140531_BRD001_0.jpg FOR any Scot concerned about their economy, these are confusing times. An independence vote looms, scheduled for September 18th. Nationalists promise a boom, as ties with England, Northern Ireland and Wales are cut. The British government says life will be far better for Scots if they vote to stay in the union. The opposing tribes back up their claims with rigorous-looking official statistics. Who is right? Alex Salmond, Scotland’s first minister, produced a striking new set of numbers on May 28th. By his reckoning every Scot will be £1,000 ($1,670) a year better off if they go it alone. Danny Alexander, a Liberal Democrat MP, raised the stakes in a UK Treasury paper: they will receive a “UK dividend” of around £1,400 by staying in the union, the analysis concludes. Mr Alexander’s ...

Urban Institute: Center on Labor, Human Services and Population

Insights on Instability and Children's Development: Commentaries from Practitioners, Policymakers, and Researchers

Concern is growing about the damage that instability can do to children's healthy development. However it has emerged separately across different domains, with little focus on the pervasive and interconnected nature of the issue or on possible cross-cutting policy solutions. In November 2013, the Urban Institute convened policymakers, practitioners, and researchers to discuss the implications of instability for children's development, as well as what we know, need to learn, and need to do across research, policy, and practice. This paper contains essays from some of the meeting participants; a companion report includes the insights from the conference.

Exploring Instability and Children's Well-Being: Insights from a Dialogue among Practitioners, Policymakers and Researchers

Concern is growing about the damage that instability can do to children's healthy development. However it has emerged separately across different domains, with little focus on the pervasive and interconnected nature of the issue or on possible cross-cutting policy solutions. This report presents the insights gleaned from a November 2013 convening of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers about the implications of stability and instability for children's development, as well as what we know, what we need to learn, and what we need to do across research, policy, and practice. A companion report includes essays from some of the meeting participants.

Self-Employment, Family-Business Ownership, and Economic Mobility

Surprisingly little is known about whether self-employment and family businesses promote mobility, despite a recurring theme in the policy discourse of families achieving upward economic and social mobility through entrepreneurship. The rewards of entrepreneurship can be great for those who succeed, but the risks are also greater. Looking over numerous decades of panel data on Americans, we document that family-business owners have more upward mobility and less downward mobility than wage-and-salary workers, but that the self-employed do not outperform other workers.

Expanding Apprenticeship Training In Canada: Perspectives From International Experience

Concern about a rising "skills gap" alongside high unemployment is emerging as a key competitiveness issue in North America. Among Canadian companies, 59 per cent of department executives expressed concern about the availability of needed skills over the next two years. This report examines the rationale for expanding apprenticeship training in Canada and the implications for policy and practice. It considers the benefits of a robust apprenticeship system, as well as potential concerns, describes the scale and composition of the current Canadian apprenticeship system, and concludes with recommendations for increasing apprenticeships in Canada.

Impact of the Great Recession and Beyond: Disparities in Wealth Building by Generation and Race

This paper uses over two decades of Survey of Consumer Finances data and a pseudo-panel technique to measure the impact of the Great Recession on wealth relative to the counterfactual of what wealth would have been given wealth accumulation trajectories. Our regression-adjusted synthetic cohort-level models find that the Great Recession reduced the wealth of American families by 28.5 percentnearly double the magnitude of previous pre-post mean descriptive estimates and double the magnitude of any previous recession since the 1980s. The housing market was only part of the story; all major wealth components fell as a result of the Great Recession.

[INED] Flux RSS

Family policy in France and Europe : recent changes and effects of the crisis

Population and Societies n°512 by Olivier Thévenon, Willem Adema, Nabil Ali

Violence and Gender Relations: Contexts and Consequences of Violence Against Women and Men

Working paper n°212 by Christelle Hamel

Les Lundis : Enquête sur les Conditions de Vie des Ménages Après Séisme en Haïti

Le 02/06/14 à Ined, salle Sauvy de 14h à 15h; intervenante : Claire Zanuso (DIAL-Université Paris-dauphine) ; discutant : Jean-Louis LANOË (Inserm-Ined)

Les Lundis : Inégalité d’accès à la promotion selon le sexe en Egypte : Les employeurs vont-ils au-delà de leurs préjugés ?

Le 26/05/14 à Ined, salle Sauvy de 14h à 15h; intervenante : Lamia Kandil (Ined) ; discutante : Dominique Meurs (EconomiX , Université Paris Ouest et Ined)

Les Lundis : Insurrections arabes : utopie révolutionnaire et impensé démocratique

Le 19/05/14 à Ined, salle Sauvy de 14h à 15h; intervenant : Smaïn Laacher (Université de Strasbourg/Ined); discutant : Jean-Yves Moisseron (IRD)