26 Jun 2016

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

As Bangladesh Counts Rohingya, Some Fear Forced Relocation

It is the first time the country has conducted a census of the refugees who have poured across the border fleeing persecution in Myanmar.

Obamacare’s Striking Effect on America’s Least Fortunate

The legislation has helped many of the least privileged people in the country get health insurance.

Website Seeks to Make Government Data Easier to Sift Through

Data USA, a project by the M.I.T. Media Lab and Deloitte, is free to use and its software code is open source, so that developers can build custom applications.

The Geography of Trumpism

A look at the counties that have a high level of support for Donald Trump shows the factors that predict his popularity.

New Federal Website Aims to Enhance Community Services

Opportunity.census.gov will bring together data from several agencies in the hope of giving cities insights into how to provide children with better opportunities.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

The demographic situation in Europe in 2060

The MPIDR researcher Fanny Kluge has estimated how different the effects of an aging society will be on different European countries. One finding of her work is that the countries that have yet to recover from the Great Recession will face massive problems within a few decades. 

“Forecasts are the ultimate test of whether a theory is correct"

Since April 2016, Roland Rau has been heading the new MPIDR research group "Mathematical and Actuarial Demography". In this interview, he explains why it is important to return to the origins of demography.

A full-time job is good for single parents

Single parents get ill notably more often than mothers who have a partner at their side. MPIDR-researcher Mine Kühn has investigated why this is so. She found out that a job worked full-time of all positively affects the health of these women.

“We don’t know nearly enough about migration”

In an article that appeared today in the scientific journal Science, leading researchers in the field of migration call for better data on migration flows for research and policy-making.

What life expectancy does to equality

Women outlive men in almost all countries. The genders are converging but some differences will remain, says MPIDR-researcher Anna Oksuzyan in an article on sueddeutsche.de  about her research.

Demography Matters

Some demographic perspectives on Brexit and the future United Kingdom

I've been spending today taking in the fact that the vote in the British referendum on European Union membership went in favour of the Leave camp. There's certainly going to be repercussions in Canada, with Torontoist noting the impact on Toronto-based businesses of British instability, the Toronto Star observing that the United Kingdom has become a less attractive platform for European business,

On the Toronto AIDS Memorial and the impact of HIV antiretrovirals in the mid-1990s

I was in the area and it seemed apropos after the Orlando shooting, so I went off to visit Toronto's AIDS Memorial, in Church and Wellesley's Barbara Hall Park, before I went to work Monday afternoon. It is simple enough, pillars almost two metres high each with six inscribed metal plates of the names of the dead, organized chronologically by the year of their death, in a peaceful garden. It is a

"Theo Moudakis: Census time"

Yesterday's Toronto Star editorial cartoon by Theo Moudakis was one that I thought would appeal to readers. That is all.

On #census2016 in Canada

The return of the long-form census has become a trending hashtag on Twitter, #Census2016. It was more than that: As both the CBC and the Huffington Post noted, when the census collection period began on the 2nd of May, it became a major pop-culture trend in Canada. So many people responded that the official census website was briefly knocked down. Me, I decided to be fashionably late. One in

On speculating about the effects of German labour market restrictions in 2004

In February 2013, in noting the arguments of Jonathan Last about migration, I noted that policy on migration--in sending countries and in receiving countries--was important in directing flows. The example I used was that of post-2004 Polish migration to the United Kingdom. Consider the movement of Poles to Germany. Large-scale Polish migration west dates back to the beginning of the Ostflucht,

The Economist

Demographics: Not so fast

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Looking for a home Fly Title:  Demographics Rubric:  Refugees cannot solve Europe’s demographic woes A CONSPIRACY THEORY took hold in Germany last year: it was self-interest, said critics, not compassion, that led Angela Merkel to open the door to hundreds of thousands of refugees. Greying Germany, expected to lose 10m of its current population of 81m by 2060, desperately needed an injection of young workers to boost its labour force and prop up its pension schemes. Who better to provide it than the young migrants streaming across the border? And what was good for Germany was good for its neighbours. Nine of the world’s ten countries with the highest share of over-65s are European (the tenth is Japan). Nor are more babies likely to bring relief: the fertility rate in all EU countries is below—often far below—the replacement rate of 2.1 children per woman. Four-fifths of asylum applicants in the EU last year were younger than 35. Thanks to immigration, Germany’s population stopped falling in 2011 and has been rising ...

The week ahead: Bye bye baby

UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  The week ahead Byline:  Economist.com Main image:  20160430_mma905_107.jpg Rubric:  This week our correspondents discuss Uber's ongoing battle over the rights of its drivers and the curious case of declining birth rates in rich countries Published:  20160429 Source:  Online extra Enabled

Immigrant fertility: Fecund foreigners?

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to measure prosperity Fly Title:  Immigrant fertility Location:  DUISBURG Rubric:  Immigrants do less to raise birth rates than is generally believed FOR a Turkish woman ready to start a household, Weseler Strasse in Duisburg is a one-stop shop. There, in the shadow of an enormous steel works, are dozens of stores selling wedding dresses and glitzy tuxedos; jewellery and home furnishings. What this stretch of Weseler Strasse does not contain is a baby shop. In the early 1980s women with foreign passports in Duisburg had a birth rate much higher than native Germans (see chart). Most of the foreigners were Turks, who had settled in this Ruhr Valley city for its industrial jobs and brought their big-family culture with them. But then came an astonishing drop. Today foreigners are actually slightly less fertile than natives. That is saying something: German women in Duisburg, and in Germany as a whole, do not have nearly enough babies to keep the ...

Demography: The strange case of the missing baby

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to measure prosperity Fly Title:  Demography Main image:  20160430_IRD001_0.jpg Rubric:  As the financial crisis hit, birth rates fell in rich countries, as expected. But a persistent baby bust is a real puzzle HE IS not exactly leading by example, but Pope Francis wants more babies. “The great challenge of Europe is to return to being mother Europe,” he said last year, while suggesting that young people might be having too few children because they preferred holidays. Europe certainly lacks young souls, particularly in Catholic countries such as Italy and Spain. But the baby shortage is broader: mother America and mother Australia have gone missing, too. They were certainly present a decade ago. Although birth rates were low in the former communist countries of eastern Europe, and in traditionalist places where it is hard to combine work with motherhood—think Japan, South Korea and southern Europe—many countries were having a baby boom. In the decade ...

Chinese economic data: Fudge-ocracy

UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The new normal Fly Title:  Chinese economic data Location:  SHANGHAI Main image:  Four babies, by the local count Rubric:  The way to get ahead in China is to manipulate statistics Four babies, by the local count IN THEORY Chinese officials receive promotions based on their performance against a range of targets: delivering strong growth, maintaining social stability and, until recently, enforcing the one-child policy. But scholars debate whether the system really rewards those who excel according to these (in any case flawed) metrics. Some believe the emphasis on merit is real, and helps explain China’s stunning economic progress over the past 35 years. Others reckon that connections to the right leaders matter more for those trying to advance their careers. New research, however, suggests a third option: that those who get ahead are adept not at stimulating growth nor at currying favour, ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]

We only die once… but from how many causes? Population and Societies June, 2016

Agreement renewed between INSTAT and INED