29 Aug 2016

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

Australia Stops Online Collection of Census Data After Cyberattacks

Officials said that a website where citizens could upload information had experienced four denial-of-service attacks, but that no data had been compromised.

The Wrong Way to Count Prisoners

By including inmates in the population of the place where they are held, the Census Bureau is unfairly giving some voters more political power.

How Polling Can Go Wrong

Pre-election polls show Democrats doing better among white voters than the exit polls do.

As Bangladesh Counts Rohingya, Some Fear Forced Relocation

It is the first time the country has conducted a census of the refugees who have poured across the border fleeing persecution in Myanmar.

Obamacare’s Striking Effect on America’s Least Fortunate

The legislation has helped many of the least privileged people in the country get health insurance.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

European Population Conference 2016

Many MPIDR researchers will present their work at the European Population Conference, which takes place in Mainz from 31 August to 3 September. The Institute will also have an exihibition booth.

India: 26.8 million people with disabilities

About one billion people worldwide and 27 million people in India have disabilities. MPIDR researchers found out that large disparities are hidden behind the large number for India, with disability prevalence most pronounced in disadvantaged regions and disadvantaged socioeconomic groups.

Why men feel healthier and women live longer

In most countries, men score pretty well in assessing their own health. Yet they have a lower life expectancy. The paradox is especially pronounced in Russia, where men on average die eleven years earlier – yet they are healthier. Or are they not?

Unequal distribution of life-years

Read in the new issue of " Demografische Forschung Aus Erster Hand " why men feel that they are healthier yet women live longer, and how the job, money, and education determines our life expectancy.

The demographic situation in Europe in 2060

The MPIDR researcher Fanny Kluge has estimated how different the effects of an aging society will be on different European countries. One finding of her work is that the countries that have yet to recover from the Great Recession will face massive problems within a few decades. 

Demography Matters

#CensusFail, or, how #Census2016 is not as big a hit in Australia as in Canada

I've learned that the Australian census, recently concluded, has been the subject of as much controversy as in Canada in recent years. The big difference is that, whereas Canada's census controversies were contrived by the then-ruling Conservative Party government, Australia's worries are more deeply rooted. Bloomberg's Michael Heath authored the article "Census Boycott Gathers Momentum Amid

On the Jedi phenomenon and the Australian census

Via io9, I learned of a Brisbane Times article dealing with the Jedi phenomenon in the Australian census. Funny as the idea of claiming the faith of the Jedi Knights of Star Wars fame might be, it messes with census data. The Jedi phenomenon began in 2001 when an email campaign mistakenly claimed the government would have to recognise it as an official religion if 8000 people selected it in the

Four article links on the aftermath of the 2016 Canada census

What, might readers of Demography Matters ask, has become of the Canadian census? Four article illustrate the contours surrounding this issue. Last week in The Globe and Mail, Tavia Grant's article "Census response rate is 98 per cent, early calculations show" featured. Canadians really were, it seems, enthusiastic about the census. Statistics Canada is still calculating exact response rates,

"Brexit was fueled by irrational xenophobia, not real economic grievances"

Vox's Zack Beauchamp has a great extended article, "Brexit was fueled by irrational xenophobia, not real economic grievances", that takes a look at how migration concerns helped create a pro-Brexit majority. Critically, as far as he can prove, these seem not to have been based on actual issues, but rather on perceptions. The surge [of immigrants] was a result (in part but not in whole) of EU

Some demographic perspectives on Brexit and the future United Kingdom

I've been spending today taking in the fact that the vote in the British referendum on European Union membership went in favour of the Leave camp. There's certainly going to be repercussions in Canada, with Torontoist noting the impact on Toronto-based businesses of British instability, the Toronto Star observing that the United Kingdom has become a less attractive platform for European business,

The Economist

Demography and desire: The empty crib

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Brave new worlds Fly Title:  Demography and desire Location:  ATHENS, LAGOS AND MUMBAI Main image:  20160827_FBD001_0.jpg Rubric:  Our poll of 19 countries reveals a neglected global scourge: the number of would-be parents who have fewer children than they want—or none at all ALTHOUGH he recently lost his job, T. R. Seshadri is a contented middle-aged man. He rides a Royal Enfield motorbike and plays badminton every day. Two years ago he acquired a small flat on the outskirts of Mumbai, which he plans to rent out. Most satisfying of all, Mr Sesadri and his wife have two children, a boy and a girl—“the perfect combination”, he says. An only child does not learn to compromise, argues Mr Seshadri. A lone boy never has to wait for his sibling to leave the bathroom and never has to concede over which television programme to watch. But three children are too many in modern ...

Demographics: Not so fast

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Looking for a home Fly Title:  Demographics Rubric:  Refugees cannot solve Europe’s demographic woes A CONSPIRACY THEORY took hold in Germany last year: it was self-interest, said critics, not compassion, that led Angela Merkel to open the door to hundreds of thousands of refugees. Greying Germany, expected to lose 10m of its current population of 81m by 2060, desperately needed an injection of young workers to boost its labour force and prop up its pension schemes. Who better to provide it than the young migrants streaming across the border? And what was good for Germany was good for its neighbours. Nine of the world’s ten countries with the highest share of over-65s are European (the tenth is Japan). Nor are more babies likely to bring relief: the fertility rate in all EU countries is below—often far below—the replacement rate of 2.1 children per woman. Four-fifths of asylum applicants in the EU last year were younger than 35. Thanks to immigration, Germany’s population stopped falling in 2011 and has ...

The week ahead: Bye bye baby

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  The week ahead Byline:  Economist.com Main image:  20160430_mma905_107.jpg Rubric:  This week our correspondents discuss Uber's ongoing battle over the rights of its drivers and the curious case of declining birth rates in rich countries Published:  20160429 Source:  Online extra Enabled

Demography: The strange case of the missing baby

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to measure prosperity Fly Title:  Demography Main image:  20160430_IRD001_0.jpg Rubric:  As the financial crisis hit, birth rates fell in rich countries, as expected. But a persistent baby bust is a real puzzle HE IS not exactly leading by example, but Pope Francis wants more babies. “The great challenge of Europe is to return to being mother Europe,” he said last year, while suggesting that young people might be having too few children because they preferred holidays. Europe certainly lacks young souls, particularly in Catholic countries such as Italy and Spain. But the baby shortage is broader: mother America and mother Australia have gone missing, too. They were certainly present a decade ago. Although birth rates were low in the former communist countries of eastern Europe, and in traditionalist places where it is hard to combine work with motherhood—think Japan, South Korea and southern Europe—many countries were having a baby ...

Immigrant fertility: Fecund foreigners?

Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to measure prosperity Fly Title:  Immigrant fertility Location:  DUISBURG Rubric:  Immigrants do less to raise birth rates than is generally believed FOR a Turkish woman ready to start a household, Weseler Strasse in Duisburg is a one-stop shop. There, in the shadow of an enormous steel works, are dozens of stores selling wedding dresses and glitzy tuxedos; jewellery and home furnishings. What this stretch of Weseler Strasse does not contain is a baby shop. In the early 1980s women with foreign passports in Duisburg had a birth rate much higher than native Germans (see chart). Most of the foreigners were Turks, who had settled in this Ruhr Valley city for its industrial jobs and brought their big-family culture with them. But then came an astonishing drop. Today foreigners are actually slightly less fertile than natives. That is saying something: German women in Duisburg, and in Germany as a whole, do not have nearly enough babies to ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

In the press this week

A selection of French press article on population issues [FR]

Les Lundis, INED’seminars resume late September

"Lundis de l’INED" are interrupted from early July to late September

The end of one child per family in China?

Population and Societies n° 535, July 2016