23 Aug 2017

General News & Items of Interest to DemographersRSS


NY Times Census News

Save the Census

The accuracy of the 2020 census is endangered by budget and staffing problems, and an administration at war with facts.

How the Growth of E-Commerce Is Shifting Retail Jobs

Although online shopping companies have created hundreds of thousands of jobs, they have not directly made up for the losses at traditional retailers, and the new jobs tend to be concentrated in a small number of large cities.

Australia, Diverse and Graying. Also: Johnny Depp, and a Controversial Push to Decrypt

Conversation starters and context, drawn from the day’s news in Australia.

Clues to a Jane Doe’s Beginning 30 Years Before Her Violent End

A reporter travels to rural South Carolina to trace the roots of a murdered drug dealer who had worked the streets of Harlem long ago.

The Census and Diversity

A Brookings fellow writes that older whites are troubled by a demographic change.

Max Planck Inst for Demographic Research

Highlights of the Rostock Retreat data visualization workshop from Twitter

Data visualization enthusiats gathered at the MPIDR in Rostock for the first Rostock Retreat workshop, testing a new interactive event format. A Storify of the highlights.

Bechstein´s bats don´t age

Bechstein’s bat has a low death rate well into old age. This could be one reason why unusual natural events often have such severe consequences for the bat's populations.

A healthy lifestyle increases life expectancy by up to seven years

People with good health behaviors can expect to live seven years longer than the general population, and to spend most of these extra years in good health.

Children born to fathers

A new analysis shows for the first time that the male birth rate in eastern Germany has hit a global record low.

Coming in to stay?


In the new issue of “Demografische Forschung Aus Erster Hand,” read about the values, goals, and perceptions of refugees in Austria, and about why the birth rate of German men is lower than the birth rate of German women. 

Demography Matters

On the recent fall in American fertility rates: Is this American convergence?

The Washington Post was just one of many news sources to note a recent report provided by the National Vital Statistics System of the Centers for Disease Control, "Births: Provisional Data for 2016" (PDF format). This report noted that not only had the absolute number of births fallen, but that the total fertility rate in 2016 was the lowest it had been in more than three decades: "The 2016 total

Hans Rosling, in memoriam

I was shocked and saddened to learn of the death earlier this week of Gapminder's Hans Rosling. 68 was too young for anyone, certainly too young for someone so dedicated to helping the world know itself through the truth. Scott Gilmore's article in MacLean's is one I recommend. From Davos, to the White House, to the offices of the World Bank, Rosling could be found tirelessly preaching the

On Max Roser's A history of global living conditions in 5 charts and the future

Some days ago, I saw shared on Facebook an essay, Max Roser's "A history of global living conditions in 5 charts" at the Our World in Data project. In this essay, Roser makes the argument--contrary to the zeigeist of 2016--that, in fact, in the longue durée things have been getting decidedly better for people. Extreme poverty and premature mortality have faded, rates of literacy and education

Nature's Amy MaxMen on the achievements of Gapminder's Hans Rosling

In January 2011 and June 2013, I linked to two videos by Swedish statistician and popularizer Hans Rosling demonstrating different demographic trends. Today, via 3 Quarks Daily, I came across Amy Maxmen's excellent long-format article on Rosling and his accomplishments, "Three minutes with Hans Rosling will change your mind about the world". It does a great job of explaining just what Rosling,

"Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief"

Canadian newsmagazine MacLean's hosts Jordan Press' Canadian Press article "Census still vulnerable to political meddling, says former chief". Wayne Smith warns that the Canadian census is still vulnerable to political interference, even with new legislation. The federal government’s bid to protect Statistics Canada from political interference has a significant oversight that exposes the census

The Economist

Demography: The rise of childlessness

Print section Print Rubric:  More adults in the rich world are not having children. That is no reason to panic Print Headline:  The rise of childlessness Print Fly Title:  Demography UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to deal with Venezuela Fly Title:  Demography Location:  TOKYO Main image:  20170729_IRD001_0.jpg POCKET LIVING has been building and selling small flats in London since 2005. The flats have many of the things that young, single people want, such as bicycle storage, and lack the things they do not, such as large kitchens and lots of bookshelves. At first, Pocket expected that most buyers would be in their late 20s, says Marc Vlessing, the firm’s boss. Instead the average age is 32, and rising. It is not that many buyers are yet to have children, speculates Mr Vlessing; ...

Daily chart: Why Europe needs more migrants

Main image:  EUROPE’S biggest countries were once among the biggest anywhere. In 1950, four of the world’s ten most populous states were in western Europe alone. But decades of falling birth rates have resulted in slower population growth in Europe than in other regions. By 2017, Europe’s most populous country, Germany, ranked just 16th globally. The continent’s birth rate is now so low that the total population in many European countries has begun to decline.One solution is to attract more foreigners. This week Eurostat, the European Union's statistics agency, said that the region's population rose in 2016 solely because of immigration. The number of births and deaths were equal at 5.1m each, while net migration boosted the population by 1.5m to 511.8m. In 13 of its 28 member countries, more people died than were born last year. But not all saw their populations fall. A large intake of migrants to Germany (mainly Syrian refugees), and smaller net migration to Finland and Poland, meant that populations there still managed to grow.For all the political difficulties migrants can cause, Europe will need more of them if it wants to avoid shrinking. By 2050, Eurostat estimates that only Ireland, France, Norway and Britain would see their populations rise without migration. In contrast, Germany and Italy ...

The Economist explains: How fracking leads to babies

Main image:  THE typical family in America is changing. Couples are increasingly reluctant to seal their relationships with the stamp of marriage, or to tie the knot before having children. In 1960 fewer than a tenth of births were to unmarried women, whereas these days around two fifths of children are born out of wedlock. Economists wonder whether the changing economic fortunes of men might be driving these decisions, but struggle to disentangle the different factors at work. Recently, though, new evidence has emerged on the topic. Did, for example, the fracking boom affect family formation? It seems plausible that someone might be reluctant to marry a person with poor or worsening economic prospects. And babies are expensive; to an economist, the idea that people might be more likely to have one when they get richer is a natural one. There is some historical evidence to support both hypotheses. In response to the Appalachian coal boom of the 1970s and 1980s, marriage rates went up, as did the share of babies born to married couples. More recently, a study by David Autor, David Dorn and Gordon Hanson, three economists, found that people exposed to import competition from China over the 1990s and 2000s took a hit to their “marriage-market value”. The negative shock seemed to turn people off ...

City of cars: Paying for public transport in Los Angeles

Print section Print Rubric:  The money for public transport is there, but plenty of barriers remain Print Headline:  City of cars Print Fly Title:  Transport in Los Angeles UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to have a better death Fly Title:  City of cars Location:  LOS ANGELES Main image:  20170429_usp507.jpg WHEN the Los Angeles transit authority extended a railway to link the city’s towering downtown to Santa Monica, a swanky seaside neighbourhood, last May, Angelenos rushed to experience it as if to glimpse a celebrity. For six decades, there had been no rail connection from the centre to the Westside beaches. So exciting was the concept that queues formed at 9.30am to catch the first train at noon. A year later Los Angeles is gearing up to build a rail link to the ...

Condoms v conservatives: The problems of family planning in Nigeria

Print section Print Rubric:  Faith and tradition favour high fertility. Education pulls the other way Print Headline:  Condoms v conservatives Print Fly Title:  Birth control in Nigeria UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to have a better death Fly Title:  Condoms v conservatives Location:  KADUNA Main image:  Not a plot Not a plot NOT everyone thinks birth control is a blessing. Boko Haram, a jihadist group that terrorises north-eastern Nigeria, deems artificial contraception to be a product of infidel learning, and therefore forbidden. Its ideologues also believe that females should avoid school, marry early (sometimes while still children) and have lots of babies. In the dwindling areas the jihadists control, women have no choice. Even outside those areas, contraception is ...

Urban Institute

Death Rates for US Women Ages 15 to 54 : Some Unexpected Trends

Recent trends in death rates among US women ages 15 to 54 reveal that rates among non-Hispanic whites are rising for many causes of death. These rising causes include accidental poisoning (linked to the epidemic of prescription opioids), suicide, and obesity- and smoking-related diseases. Specific changes in behavior might reduce some of these death rates, but the range of rising causes of death among white women suggests a need for a broader perspective on the social determinants of health. Unhealthy behaviors often arise and persist within certain social and economic contexts, and such behaviors resist improvement or are replaced by other unhealthy behaviors unless those contexts change.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 2: Financial Literacy and Asset Building Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why financial literacy and asset building services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care

Policymakers have long been concerned about the poor outcomes experienced by youth in foster care transitioning to adulthood. Experimental evaluations of independent living programs conducted under the John H Chafee Independence Act found the programs studied showed limited evidence of effectiveness; however, the evaluation made important observations about independent living programs overall and provided guidance for ongoing efforts to improve services for transition-age youth in foster care. This brief presents a conceptual framework, typology, and central conclusions from current planning efforts to develop an agenda for future evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care, Issue Brief 1: Education Programs

This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why education services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the current types of programs and services offered in this service area, and the effectiveness of these services. Drawing on a review of existing research and convenings conducted with researchers, program managers, and federal staff, this brief address remaining research gaps and how the available evidence should inform future planning for evaluation activities.

INED

7 milliards et demi d’humains, Conférence Campus Condorcet

by Gilles Pison

Rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois 2017

Les Éditions Ined seront présentes au Salon du livre.

Resumption of the Lundis de l’INED on October 2, 2017

Young author’s prize for the revue Population "Selective adult migration and urban-rural mortality differentials in Burkina Faso"

Le chômage des immigrés : quelle est la part des discriminations ?

Population and Societies n° 546, July-August 2017 by Dominique Meurs

INED recruits personnel at all levels on temporary assignments to address specific one-off needs.